Cyprus – historical sites

Hala Sultan Tekke
Name:
Church of Agios Lazaros
Period:
Byzantine Empire
Date:
900AD – 999AD
City/Town:
Larnaca
Resorts:
Larnaca,

about church of agios lazaros

The Church of Agios Lazaros, also known as Church of Ayios Lazaros, is a Byzantine creation built in the tenth century AD over the believed tomb of Saint Lazarus. Saint Lazarus is said to have been resurrected by Jesus and then to have fled to Cyprus, where he was ordained as a Bishop.

Visitors can enter the crypt of the Church of Agios Lazaros to see his reputed tomb as well as those of other buried there.

Used as a mosque during the Ottoman occupation of Cyprus, the Church of Agios Lazaros was then reverted to a church. It has suffered damage over the years, including a devastating fire, but has been restored on different occasions.

 

Name:
Amathus
Alt Name:
Amathous
Country:
Cyprus
Date:
2000BC – 1001BC
City/Town:
Limassol
Resorts:
Limassol,
Related:
Kalavasos-TentaChoirokoitia

about amathus

Amathus is an archaeological site in Cyprus containing the remains of one of the island’s oldest ancient towns.

Known to have been inhabited since at least 1050BC, the origins of Amathus are unclear. It is believed to have been founded by the Eteocyprians and to have flourished and grown. Over time, it played host to the Greeks, the Phoenicians, the Persians, the Ptolemies and the Romans. The abandonment of Amathus appears to have occurred in the late seventh century.

Amathus is strongly connected with the cult of Aphrodite as well as having links to the legend of Ariadne. Today, the ruins of Amathus include several ancient sites, including several tombs, an acropolis with a first century AD Roman temple to Aphrodite, an agora with some public baths and the remains of the eighth century BC palace of Amathus.

Choirokoitia
City/Town:
Choirokoitia
Figure:
 –
Resorts:
Choirokoitia,
Related:
Kalavasos-Tenta,

about choirokoitia

Choirokoitia in Cyprus was a prehistoric agricultural settlement from 7000BC and the first site of human habitation on the island. According to UNESCO, who have inscribed it as a World Heritage site, Choirokoitia is “one of the most important prehistoric sites in the eastern Mediterranean”, particularly as it played a significant role in the area’s cultural development.

Today, visitors can see the remains of Choirokoitia as well as reconstructions of the circular huts which once characterised it.

Name:
Kalavasos-Tenta
City/Town:
Kalavasos
Resorts:
Kalavasos,
Related:
Choirokoitia,

about kalavasos-tenta

Kalavasos-Tenta (or just “Tenta”) is an archaeological site in Cyprus housing the remains of a Neolithic settlement dating back to the eighth millennium BC. The ruins at Kalavasos-Tenta include the remains of the winding walls of what were the circular huts of the village.

Name:
Kolossi Castle
Continent:
MIDDLE-EAST
Period:
Late Medieval (1300AD-1500AD)
Sub-Region:
Date:
1400AD – 1499AD
City/Town:
Kolossi
Figure:
 –
Resorts:
Limassol,
Related:

about kolossi castle

Kolossi Castle was originally a thirteenth century Frankish fortification near Limassol in Cyprus.

Constructed by the Knights Hospitallers in 1210, Kolossi Castle almost exclusively remained in their possession until it was destroyed by Mameluke raids in 1525/6. The only interruption occurred between 1306 and 1313, when it was taken over by the Knights Templar.

The current Kolossi Castle was built in 1454 under the orders of Louis de Magnac. His coat of arms can be seen on the wall of the structure.

Name:
Kourion
Continent:
MIDDLE-EAST
Alt Name:
Curium
Country:
Cyprus
Period:
Ancient Greece
Sub-Region:
Date:
2000BC – 1001BC
City/Town:
Episkopi
Figure:
Alexander the Great
Resorts:
Limassol,
Related:
Tombs of the Kings – Paphos,Church of Agios Lazaros,
Nea PafosPalaipafos,

about kourion

Kourion, also known as Curium, is an impressive archaeological site near Limassol in Cyprus containing mostly Ancient Roman and Byzantine ruins.

In fact, it is believed that the site of Kourion was first inhabited during Neolithic times, with the earliest evidence dating back to 4500-3900 BC, but that the town itself was founded in the thirteenth century BC by the Argives.

Over the centuries, Kourion has played important roles in many regional conflicts. During the Cypriot uprising against Persia (fifth century BC), its king – Stasanor – betrayed his country, lending his support and troops to the Persians. However, Kourion later supported Alexander the Great’s fight against the Persians (fourth century BC).

Kourion continued to be inhabited throughout the Roman and Byzantine periods, with the establishment of buildings, monuments and other structures from these times still visible today. Perhaps the most memorable site to be seen today at Kourion is its ancient theatre. Still intact and able to seat up to 3,500 spectators, the theatre at Kourion dates back to the second or third century AD, although there would have been a theatre here from the second century BC.

However, the theatre is definitely not the only thing to see at Kourion. The site includes the remains of a third century AD Roman market which includes some public baths and a Nymphaeum.

Several additional ancient buildings remain, including part of the fourth century AD House of Achilles – thought to have been a reception centre – with its mosaic floors and the third century AD House of the Gladiators, so named because some of its mosaics depict gladiatorial battles. The complex of Eustolios is another fascinating site, this having been an affluent fourth to fifth century private residence in Kourion and including a bathing complex.

Kourion also possesses evidence of early Christianity, both at the complex of Eustolios and by way of its early Christian basilica, a fifth century AD church at the site. Other sites of Kourion include the remains of a stadium and the Sanctuary of Apollo Hylates. However, it is worth noting that these latter two sites are slightly separate from the rest of the archaeological park.

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